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Bass Angler Magazine

Effective Peacock Bass Fishing Tips When Angling In Singapore

With over 18.5 million visitors in 2018, Singapore is one of the most visited nations in Southeast Asia. This tropical country has a 197 kilometer of coastline, which makes it an ideal destination for anglers from different parts of the world. But not all coastal areas of Singapore can be considered as a fishing spot. In fact, anglers can only fish legally in selected waterways and reservoirs. While the options are limited, anglers can still capture large sizes of peacock bass in the country. If you are planning to go on your first bass fishing trip in the country, there are several things to keep in mind.

Know All The Legal Fishing Spots

PUB, the national water agency of Singapore, implements a program to regulate all the water activities in the country. The program, called the Active, Beautiful, Clean Waters (ABC Waters) handles sports and other water activities like dragon boating, kayaking, as well as fishing. This is their way of preserving the water sources of the nation. So before you book a flight to the Lion City to catch a peacock bass or two, you need to have a list of places where you can fish without breaking the law.

The areas in Singapore where it is legal to fish include the Bedok Reservoir, Gaylang River, Jurong Lake, Kolam Ayer ABC Waterfront, Kranji Reservoir, Lower Pierce Reservoir, and Lower Seletar Reservoir. You can also fish in the waters of the MacRitchie Reservoir, the Marina Reservoir, the Pandan Reservoir, the Pang Sua Canal, as well as the Pelton Canal. Aside from these places, you can also fish in the Rochor Canal, the Serangoon Reservoir, and the Upper Seletar Reservoir.

If you wish to fish in these places, you must always follow the rules and regulations released by PUB. These include fishing in the mentioned areas, as well as using only artificial baits at the reservoirs. If you violate these rules, you could be fined by as much as SGD 3,000.

Prepare For Your Bass Fishing Trip

Even if you are a seasoned angler, you need to make sure that you are well prepared for the trip. You must have all the necessary fishing lures and tackle that you need to successfully catch peacock bass in Singapore, including walking the dog type topwater lures and walking stick lures. These lures act in a way that can attract the attention of peacock bass. You may also bring some poppers to release a loud popping sound to encourage more strikes.

Aside from your fishing tackle and equipment, you must also prepare yourself physically. Bass are known to be one of the hardest fish to catch, which is why you will need to have as much energy as possible to score your target fish. If you are traveling to fish, it’s a wise idea to purchase travel insurance in case you get sick or face an injury on your trip. If you already feel under the weather before you even board the flight, you might reconsider postponing your trip to avoid further health complications. Remember, bass fishing can be an intense activity. That is why you need to be at your best if you want to capture the largest peacock bass during your fishing holiday.

Respect The Environment

Anglers should always practice the catch-and-release technique, unless you plan to consume the peacock bass you’re aiming to catch. It’s important to return the fish as gently as possible to lessen the chance of hurting it in the process. Also, you must always remember to throw all trash into trash bins. Leaving your fishing lines, used bait, and hooks is not a good practice because it will pollute both the water and the park. The line may also cause unwanted accidents if left lying on the ground.

Aside from these reminders, respecting Singapore’s rules regarding fishing is key to avoid any issues. As long as you are mindful of your equipment and your own health, anglers are sure to have a great time fishing for peacock bass in Singapore.

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